Employee Training and Development Process Analysis

EmployeeTraining and Development Process Analysis

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Processanalysis is the process by which the writer gives detailedexplanation step by step on how to do something or how a particularsomething is done. Employee training and development process is thetype of process analysis whereby it gives directives on how to trainas well as to develop the employees. The following are steps that arefollowed to train and develop employees

Step1: Identification of the training needs

Trainingneeds are usually identified by analyzing the major human resourceareas such as the characteristics of the job, the whole organization,and the individual needs. This step involves assessing the currentstatus of the organization on its ability to perform well and theabilities of the employees to perform their tasks (McCutcheon&amp Meredith 1993).

Step2: The trainees’ selection

Itis important to select carefully the employee who will be trainedbecause training is expensive and the organizations face thechallenge of training employees and then leave the firm for greenerpastures. The organization should ensure that the employees will beencouraged by the training program.

Step3: Training goals

Thegoals of the organization should relate directly to the goals of thetraining program that is, the mission and the strategic plan of thefirm. The core objectives of the training program should be clearlystating the skill or the behavior to be altered as a result of thetraining.

Step4: The methods of the training

Thereare two types of the training methods namely on-the-job which isdone when the employees are still performing their regular jobs andthe off-the-job training which involve techniques such as thelectures, films, case studies, discussions, a special study amongothers.

Step5: Select the mode of training

Thistechnique usually involves training by orientations, lectures, usingaudiovisual methods, the job rotation technique, and the internshipsamong others.

Step6: The trainers

Theperson who conducts the training depends on the type of the trainingthe organization requires.

Step7: The Administration of the training

Afterthe training program is planned appropriately, the training in linewith the goals of the organization is administered to the selectedemployees.

Step8: Choose a means of evaluating

Inorder to evaluate the trained employees, the organization carries outsome tests about the growth and development of the selected employeesregarding their skills and the capacity to undertake tasks comparedto the past (McCutcheon&amp Meredith 1993).

Step9: Evaluation of the training

Trainingis evaluated periodically during the process. This involves theevaluation of the comparison between the skills defined by the goalsof the training and the newly acquired skills.

Step10: Follow-up

Follow-upprograms are put into place to make sure the trained employeesdisplay some development. The following is a flow chart to map theprocess

THE TRAINEES’ SELECTION

TRAINING GOALS

OFF-THE-JOB

ON-THE-JOBVJHG

EVALUATION OF THE TRAINING

FOLLOW UP

SELECT THE MODE OF TRAINING

THE TRAINERS

CHOOSE A MEANS OF EVALUATING

THE ADMINISTRATION OF TRAINING

THE METHODS OF TRAINING

Eachof the steps takes 240 hours except the administration of thetraining that takes longer that is 720 hours.

Thesteps that add value to the process include identifying the needs oftraining, the selection of the trainees, training goal, and themethods of training, administration of training, the trainers and theevaluation of training. These steps are essential for a betteroutcome of the process analysis. The value added time for thisprocess is 300 hours. The steps such as the mode of training,choosing the means of evaluating and follow-up programs do not addvalue to the training program process analysis (McCutcheon&amp Meredith 1993).

Theratio of value added time to total time is calculated as Total timeis 240 hours and value added time is 300 hours. Hence, the velocityis 125%.

Followup is a process that can be eliminated because the process analysisis maximally done to the second last stage that is the evaluation ofthe training. To eliminate this process, the evaluation of trainingstep needs to be added value to cover up the eliminated step.

References

McCutcheon,D. M., &amp Meredith, J. R. (1993). Conducting case study researchin operations management. Journalof Operations Management,11(3),239-256.